Six Immune-Boosting Steps to a Healthy Winter

1. Get Adjusted. Clinical studies show that after an adjustment, subjects had 200 times as many immune cells as subjects who did not get adjusted. If you’re starting to feel symptoms, get an adjustment.

2. Get Outside. Sunshine and fresh air are two of the body’s most important nutrients! Healthy Vitamin D levels from moderate sun exposure are linked to stronger immune systems. In the winter, avoid being cooped up indoors, breathing in toxins and allergens. Get outside for at least a few minutes a day, and breathe!

3. Calm Stress. The nervous system and the immune system are inextricably linked. That’s why you may be more likely to “get sick” more when you are stressed-out.
Getting adjusted is like getting a tune-up for your nervous system, giving it the tools to keep stress at bay. Meditation, massage, and moderate exercise like walking and yoga are also great stress-busters.

4. Let the Good Bugs Grow. Did you know that 60-70% of your immune system is located in your gut? Keep your digestion running smoothly, and fight bad bugs with good ones, by taking a daily probiotic and eating naturally fermented and cultured foods like real sauerkraut, kombucha and kefir.

5. Give Yourself a Natural Boost. Herbal supplements and foods like elderberry, echinacea and goldenseal, olive leaf, garlic, ginger and coconut oil have natural immune-enhancing and anti-microbial properties. Cod liver oil, long a staple in the northern climates, contains a significant amount of vitamin D, plus health-enhancing Omegas.

6. Drink More Water! Our health is truly dependent on the quality and quantity of water that we drink. Your body is made up of mostly water, and every organ and metabolic process in your body relies on having enough water to function optimally and flush out toxins. So drink up!

Giving Thanks

“At times our own light goes out and is rekindled by a spark from another person. Each of us has cause to think with deep gratitude of those who have lighted the flame within us.” ~ Albert Schweitzer

One of the original chiropractic teachers talked about the light within us as our Innate Intelligence. He proposed that lack of adaptation to our life stresses — physical, chemical, mental and emotional — block this Intelligence from being expressed. He hoped that chiropractic would be a means for people to express more of their inborn potential or to shine their light. Today we, Dr. Steve and I, give thanks to our many mentors who have helped our lights to shine so that we can bring our very best to you, our community.

May your light shine through today and every day of your life. May you find ways to remove any of the “clouds” that block your light. May you find tools that amplify the gifts that you were innately born with. As we prepare to celebrate Thanksgiving Day, 2011, Community Chiropractic offers gratitude for our community and our ability to participate and be of service to it.

May all of us be well, happy, and in peace on this day and every day.

About Vitamin D – Part Three

As we wrote about last week, vitamin D is an important ingredient of human nutrition, which is in the form of vitamin D2 and D3. Vitamin D is required by the human body in small quantities; but, a regular intake of the foods containing vitamin D is necessary for good overall health. Because we spend so much more time indoors or blocking sunlight when we are outside, the production of vitamin D in the human skin has reduced drastically.

Foods That Contain Vitamin D

• One of the biggest food sources of vitamin D is the oil that is derived from fish such as Cod. Most of the fish that contain a generous amount of fat prove to be a good source of vitamin D.
• The cod liver oil that is derived from the cod fish, if consumed regularly and periodically proves to be very healthy for the body, especially for the skin.
• Herring also provides a good quantity of vitamin D.
• Some fish become good sources of vitamin D, only when they are cooked. Some of the prominent examples are: Salmon, Mackerel and Eel.
• Canned Sardine and Tuna are also very good sources of vitamin D.
• Some people are always surprised to hear this, but an egg consumed every day also provides the required quantity of vitamin D in the human body.
• Cooked beef, liver and some specific types of mushrooms are also very good vitamin D food sources.
• It is also advisable that if possible, one should stand in the fresh morning sunlight for about 10 to 15 minutes every day, in order to generate natural and adequate quantities of vitamin D in the skin itself.

About Vitamin D, Part Two

Lack of Vitamin D — Symptoms

There are many factors that lead to the presence of symptoms due to lack of Vitamin D. Some of these reasons are given below.

• Lack of foods rich in vitamin D in your diet.
• Minimal exposure to sunlight.
• Failure of kidneys to convert vitamin D to its active form.
• Dark skin shade in people.
• Inability of digestive tract to absorb vitamin D.
• Using too much sunscreen.
• Age and hereditary conditions.

If you are displaying lack of vitamin D symptoms, you need not worry too much because there are many cures and remedies available to you.

Depending on your age, severity of symptoms and hereditary factors, your doctor will prescribe certain medications and vitamin supplements to you to reduce and eradicate these lack of vitamin D symptoms. S/he will either provide you with some long term solutions, or alternately even give you some short term solutions, depending on which will suit you better.

Stay Healthy and Balanced During this Season

As the seasons change and the holidays approach, it seems that many of us get slowed down by colds and flus.

Here are some simple tips to avoid this pitfall and maximize your performance during this season.

Nourish Yourself

Eat foods that are warming, fresh, and well cooked; avoid dry or uncooked foods (especially salads and raw fruits and vegetables).

Drink lots of warming liquids such as hot water and herbal teas to prevent dehydration. You can prepare a fresh ginger tea by placing a teaspoon of fresh grated ginger into a pint thermos bottle and filling it with hot water.

Don’t worry if your appetite seems stronger than usual as this is a natural tendency in winter. At the same time, of course, don’t eat to the point of discomfort.

Nourish Your Senses

Stay warm. Give yourself slow, gentle self-massage in the morning or before bed. Use a nourishing, warming oil such as sesame or almond.

Put a pleasantly scented herb plant, such as lavender or rosemary, on your table. As the days get darker and we come indoors more, it can soothe your senses to bring some outdoors in.

Sleep and Restful Awareness

Get enough sleep!

Learn to meditate. Life speeds up during this time so make sure you give yourself a time out and plan some quiet time, even if only for 5-10 minutes. Take time and recharge your system.